Juvenile Law
X

location1433 3rd St, Floresville, TX 78114

Search
Phone830-769-1010

TX defense lawyerIf you are a parent, you know how hard it can be to raise children. Despite all of your efforts, your child may make mistakes that land him or her in legal trouble. Some teens and young adults end up in the back of a police car because they make poor decisions. Others simply get mixed up with the wrong crowd or are accused of something they did not actually do.

Whatever your child’s situation, you may understandably be anxious and unsure of how to handle the situation. Read on to learn three tips for parents whose children have been arrested for a criminal offense in Texas.

Remember That Your Child Has Rights

Just like adults, children and teens who are arrested have certain rights protected by the U.S. Constitution and other legislation. Your child has the right to remain silent and avoid self-incrimination. Your child also has a right to an attorney. The best advice you can give your child if he or she has been arrested is to say nothing to the police and wait for his or her lawyer to arrive.

...

TX defense lawyerFinding out that your minor child has been arrested can be terrifying. You may be worried not only about having your child locked up in a juvenile detention center, but also about how this will affect their future. Colleges and trade schools, as well as employers, may consider a person’s juvenile record. No matter which path your child plans to take after high school, a juvenile conviction could get in the way. You should also know that if your child was at least 14 years old at the time of their alleged offense, there is a risk that they could be tried and sentenced as an adult.

Texas does have a program called “deferred prosecution.” This program could provide a way to have the charges ultimately dismissed. There are steps an attorney can take to try to help your child get into this program.

How Does Deferred Prosecution Work?

In general, deferred prosecution allows juvenile offenders to have their charges dismissed after successfully completing probation. It is typically only available to first-time juvenile respondents. When an alleged juvenile offender is accepted into this program, the prosecution against them is paused. The juvenile is not required to enter a guilty plea to be accepted for deferred prosecution, which could protect them later. Should your child successfully complete their period of probation, the charge is dismissed.

...

TX defense lawyerHalloween can be tough for teenagers - they are too old to trick-or-treat but too young to join the costumed crowd in the local bar. Every year, there is an uptick in juvenile crime around Halloween as teenagers celebrate the holiday in their own way. Most teen lawbreaking around the fall holiday involves minor crimes, like vandalism, but petty crime can progress into more serious criminal activity.

Unfortunately for parents, there is no worse Halloween night trick than getting a phone call saying their son or daughter is in jail. If your minor child gets arrested for any reason this Halloween season, getting them a lawyer should be your main priority - a skilled attorney can potentially help avoid a criminal record that could follow your teen for life.

What Crimes Do Juveniles Often Commit Around Halloween?

Teen mischief has been a Halloween tradition for a long time. However, some teens go too far and end up committing crimes. It does not help that many costumes include masks, which may lead teens to feel emboldened to break the law. Around Halloween, teens often get arrested for:

...

Karnes County juvenile criminal defense attorney

A parent’s worst nightmare is seeing their child hurt in any way, even if they have done wrong. For minors who are convicted of a crime, the consequences that follow the trial can be devastating for both the child and their parent. The child will be held accountable for their actions through the juvenile justice system, either through fines, probation, or even time behind bars, and the parent is left uncertain of how to proceed. Unless you or your child have been previously convicted by the juvenile court, you likely have little knowledge of what the proceedings entail and what rights you have as a parent. If it is your first experience with the Texas juvenile justice system, there are some things that you should know, including how your actions can lead to your own set of criminal charges.

Entry of Orders Against Parents

In Texas, those tried through the juvenile justice system are 17 years or younger. At this age, children have limited capabilities to earn enough money to pay off fines, court costs, and any other fees associated with facing a criminal conviction. Because minors lack the ability to fully support themselves, the court can order the minor’s parents to do, or not to do, certain actions throughout the trial, including:

...

Atascosa County criminal defense attorney juvenile crime

Similar to parental rules or regulations set by schools, minors have more legal restrictions than those over the age of 18. This is meant to protect the children and keep them on the right track while moving toward adulthood. According to Texas law, there are two types of misconduct that can place a child under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. Conduct Indicating a Need for Supervision (CINS) cases and delinquent conduct can both leave a stain on the minor’s record. It is important to know the difference between the two and understand what conduct falls within each category to keep your child out of the criminal justice system.

Minor Criminal Offenses

CINS cases include minor criminal offenses, aside from traffic violations, and these offenses will be tried by the juvenile court. There are six types of CINS offenses listed by the Texas legislature, including any fineable offense, running away, inhalant abuse, school expulsion, prostitution, and sexting. As you can see, not all of these offenses would apply to those over the age of 18. Because these offenses are considered relatively minor, the child will face varying levels of probation, but they cannot be sentenced to jail or prison. 

...
Back to Top